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Halfar creates insect friendly area

20.05.2019 16:47 Uhr Members
 | At the new Insect Respect area in Bielefeld: Biologist Dr. Philipp Unterweger, Insect Respect initiator Hans-Dietrich Reckhaus, Kathrin Stühmeyer-Halfar and Armin Halfar (managing directors of Halfar System GmbH). © Reimar Ott

At the new Insect Respect area in Bielefeld: Biologist Dr. Philipp Unterweger, Insect Respect initiator Hans-Dietrich Reckhaus, Kathrin Stühmeyer-Halfar and Armin Halfar (managing directors of Halfar System GmbH). © Reimar Ott

The roof is awash with colours: On 18 May 2019, the bag manufacturer Halfar, together with Insect Respect, turned the roof of its Bielefeld-based company into a paradise for insects. Halfar Managing Director Armin Halfar, Insect Respect initiator Hans-Dietrich Reckhaus and the employees combined to lend a helping hand.

The two Bielefeld entrepreneurs Armin Halfar and Dr. Hans-Dietrich Reckhaus have teamed up to campaign for insects. On 18 May 2019, they organised a staff planting campaign to create an insect-friendly habitat on Halfar's roof. The staff helped to plant a biodiverse biotope. The area now serves as a compensation area for the Insect Respect quality label: the seal guarantees compensation for insect loss caused by the use of indoor insect control products. "On our area, six-legged creatures find food, hiding spots and winter quarters," says Dr. Hans-Dietrich Reckhaus, Managing Director of the Bielefeld-based biocide company Reckhaus GmbH & Co. KG and initiator of Insect Respect. Based on a scientific model, consumers are guaranteed that intrusion and compensation are in equilibrium.
“The claim of our company, ‘Competitive edge through sustainability’ should also apply to supporting biodiversity,” says Armin Halfar, Managing Director of the bag manufacturer with 120 employees.

Halfar has now covered about 450 m2 of its company roof in Bielefeld with greenery. With the advice of Insect Respect, areas have been developed to form an ideal habitat especially for insects: Heterogenous substrate types and layer thicknesses create different plant habitats. In clay and sand areas, insects find many opportunities to dig nesting holes or collect material for nests. Structural elements such as old timber (such as logs) provide insects with space to hide and cellulose to build. Some waterholes enable insects and birds to drink and bathe, especially after rainfall.

Insect-friendly habitats enhance areas. Added benefits includes a networking function with other green areas (stepping stones), extended roof life, rainwater retention, protection from high frequency electromagnetic radiation, improved ambient climate, binding of CO2 and fine particles as well as cost savings (including energy costs, sewage fees, refurbishment). Insect Respect offers land owners individual advice and conception, installation and care of insect paradises.

www.halfar.comwww.insect-respect.org

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